How One Law Firm Lost Over 5k Views Per Month by Ending Their Blog Posting

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Although I have a track record of working with many clients over a long period of time, occasionally, someone will end their services and decide to bring in an inhouse copywriter. One of my clients made that decision last summer to work with a local copywriter under the belief that this person would be able to come into their office on a weekly basis and discuss content strategy.

What happened to this law firm after they partnered with this overbooked individual, however, was that they lost more than 5,000 views per month on their blog due to lack of regular posting. This had a significant impact, not just on their traffic, but on the amount of chat sessions initiated by prospective personal injury customers and the number of phone consultations requested via the online booking tool. The firm began to experience these issues about three months after they discontinued their blog posting service with me.

What Happens When Content Drops Off the Priority List

Unfortunately, the local copywriter was unable to keep up with a consistent posting schedule. Previously, I had written for this law firm for over four years and content was published three to five times per week. That means that all of the content we published was building on previous experience and published links. We developed a working strategy that continued to bring high quality traffic to their website and, more importantly, generate conversations with the law firm.

This enabled them to streamline their client conversion process, and they became heavily reliant on this ongoing blog posting as a key driver of their traffic. This is why it was so catastrophic when they discontinued blogging for six full months.

You see, Google got confused about the purpose of the website, and whether or not the company was even still in business. When you commit to a regular posting schedule and keep up with it for a long period of time, it can be devastating when this slips for an equally or even longer period of time. Google gets confused about whether or not the company is still active, and in the meantime, this gives competitors the important opportunity to kick open the door and continue grabbing a bigger share of the market.

Especially for law firms, creating online content like blogs, it is especially important to remain competitive in these larger geographic regions when many other attorneys are also reliant on their website traffic. Any slip in your site's performance or regular posting activity could have detrimental effects for you, but it could mean more business is directed towards your competitor's website. Talk about a lose-lose situation.

Pick a Schedule You Can Stick With

Keeping on top of your regular posting schedule and having a streamlined plan in place when you need to transition from one content provider to another, can minimize potential downtime and ensure that all of the legwork you've previously put in to creating great website and blog copy is not lost due to failure to keep up with a new schedule. A content writer you bring on board should also be prepared to have several pieces in the wings for emergencies only. Since I was in the business of regularly posting for this law firm's blog for four years, I had over a month of banked content ready to go. Unfortunately, the new copywriter never even hit publish on any of those drafts, despite the fact that I had been fully paid for them with the intention that if I was ever unable to work for the client anymore or needed to go on vacation, that these could all be prescheduled and help fill the gap.

Stay Committed

One of the most dangerous things you can do with your law firm's website is to commit to a schedule of regularly posting and then drop-off due to being unable to keep it up. Make sure that the content writer hired to write your law firm's blog has enough experience and clear understanding of their own schedule to carve out what is necessary to keep up with your editorial calendar.